509-301-1377 Gillianuseag@gmail.com
1728 West First Avenue Spokane, WA 99201

Welcome to

The 1899 House Bed and Breakfast

in Spokane, WA

In 2012, after years of career work, travel, and renovations, the doors of 1899 House opened to its first guests. This is a dream fulfilled, yet remains dynamic, as we continue maintenance along with upgrades and renovations. We are committed to providing each guest with an individualized, comfortable and unforgettable Spokane Experience.

Check in to our
amazing suites today!

Rigsby Suite in 1899 House B&B
Spread out in the Rigsby Suite

The Rigsby Suite sleeps 3-persons with the use of the queen bed and foldout twin bed in the love seat. It also contains a wet bar with a wine cooler and a closet. The bathroom hosts a 7-foot rain shower with a jet option and a heated towel rack. The rates go up and down seasonally, and there is also a “third man” charge for use of the additional twin bed. It is always good to ask our innkeepers about the rate of the rooms when you call.

Dora Suite in 1899 House B&B
Relax in the Dora Suite
Our Dora Suite holds a queen bed in a gently-lighted sleeping alcove, wingback chairs, desk, a reading library, DVD player and screen. It also features a Jacuzzi tub with a hand shower. The rates go up and down seasonally, and there is also a “third man” charge for use of the additional twin bed). Dora can use the trundle beds in the adjacent common room (sharing Dora’s bath); it is always good to ask our innkeepers about the rate of the rooms when you call.

Enjoy our wonderful Hospitality Suite and common areas…

For use by all of our guests
After entering and registering on the main floor, guests may enjoy use of the living and dining rooms, with cookies, from breakfast to 10:00 p.m. After hours, guests have a private entry code for their own room and the west guest entry door. Breakfast times are flexible, and most dietary needs and allergies can be accommodated,within reason. Please chat with your Innkeeper.
Hospitality suite features
While staying at 1899 House Bed & Breakfast, take advantage of our second floor hospitality suite. This suite is for the complimentary use of all our guests, and was once an entire convenience apartment. Rarely, it will be in use as part of the Dora Suite. The Innkeeper will tell you, prior to your booking, if it is unavailable during your stay.

The hospitality suite features a DVD library, a mid-century, one-piece kitchenette with a sink, pantry storage, and refrigerator. It also features a CuisineArt automatic tea kettle water heater, juices, bottled water, instant coffee, tea, and cocoa, as well as glassware, cutlery, and small paper plates available in the pantry and refrigerator. Please let the Innkeeper know if your party has any other, or special needs.

Visitors in the living room
Amazing dining in 1899 House B&B
Front of the inn/1899 House B&B

Reserve it with the Dora suite

For families with older children (we do take well-behaved children, aged 6 and older), the hospitality suite with its trundle beds, can be reserved along with the Dora suite. A popular option for families, these two areas are connected by a small hallway. When rented as part of Dora, this otherwise common space is not available to Rigsby guests. Again, your Innkeeper will tell you if the suite is not available, prior to your booking Rigsby.

Stay in our cozy and affordable bed and breakfast the next time you’re in Spokane.

Take our convenient
360-degree virtual tour

Check out where you’ll be staying
See all of the wonderful spaces you’ll have available to you at 1899 House Bed & Breakfast. Using our convenient virtual tour, you can decide which suite you’d prefer to stay in.
View the Rigsby Suite
With our virtual tour, you can see both the bedroom and the attached bathroom of the Rigby Suite, which is the larger of our two suites; it can sleep three. Ask about the “third man” fee.
See the cozy Dora Suite
Feel at home in the cozy Dora Suite! See this suite from every angle, including a peek at the Jacuzzi tub; it sleeps two, but can be connected to the Hospitality Suite, that holds two twin beds. Ask about rate changes.
360 Virtual tour 1899 House B&B
Take a look at the common areas

You can also take a look at the common areas of our bed and breakfast, including the living room, formal dining room and the Hospitality Suite. Take our virtual tour now!

The 1899 House B&B Policies

While “discovery” of the 1899 House B&B is generally done on-line, all reservations are done by phone or begun by e-mail, directly with the Innkeeper:  509/301-1377 (text or call), or GillianUseAG@gmail.com.  No on-line booking feature is planned.  We prefer a hands-on, personal touch in business—call us “old school” if you must!  We live in this beautiful home, and want to know just a little about you and your party, prior to arrival.  We will ask about allergies, dietary challenges, flowers, and offer to assist in any way that may make our home your castle while you are with us.

Check-in time is any time from 3:00 p.m. (1500 hours) onward.  Please coordinate with the Innkeeper as instructed at booking time, if you are going to be late.  Occasionally, earlier check-ins may be accommodated by advance arrangement.  Once checked in, each guest receives a personal code for their private suite, as well as to use the west Guest Entry before or after the main floor is open.  Generally, the main floor is open to come and go from 8 a.m. to ten p.m. (0800 through 2200 hours).

Check-out time is normally by noon.  If you have a late flight or train, please let the Innkeeper know when you make booking arrangements.  Some later departures may be accommodated without charge, or luggage and belongings may be stored at the house, accessible to you, but out of your room, until your plane or train departs.

While the 1899 House is a cannabis- and smoker-friendly facility, no one is allowed, for any reason, to smoke or vape (or even burn incense or candles of any kind) at any time inside the house or their room. All smoking/vaping is only allowed on the attached porches, or in the side patio area and we are not animal-accepting.  Ash trays are provided, but please do not place smoking materials on the ground or porch floors.  If anyone is apprehended smoking or lighting anything, placement will be immediately terminated at the B&B, and we will not feel any obligation to find you another placement.

Porch The 1899 House B&B Policies
Porch The 1899 House B&B Policies
West View The 1899 House B&B Policies
Wines and liquors may be consumed in your room or in the common areas, or on the porches or side patio areas.  Glassware is available in the Hospitality kitchenette.  If you intend to have any sort of multi-person gathering or party that includes serving spirits, however, an inexpensive event permit may be required, and advance notice is necessary.  The main living/dining area and front porch or side patio may be used for small groups, with advance notice.

While Spokane has many fine dining establishments ranging from fast food chains to gourmet steakhouses, there is also take-out, and a wide variety of delivery services, such as Uber Eats, that may be used, especially if you book in inclement weather, or do not feel like eating out.  Please let the Innkeeper know so that she can watch for your delivery person if you are not going to be downstairs to do so.

When booking your stay, please let the Innkeeper know about any allergies you might have (there is a cat on premises, though not in your room), and inform her if you have special dietary considerations that might impact the breakfasts being served.

Common Areas The 1899 House B&B Policies

ADA Website Compliance:

Our goal is to provide a wonderful experience in the desirable location of Spokane, WA.   We have built our site with ADA compliance in mind and have utilized available tools such as achecker.ca and Google Chrome’s ADA compatibility diagnostic tools. Please be aware that our efforts are ongoing.  If you have difficulty navigating our website or booking a room at our inn, we ask you to contact us via telephone or email and our helpful staff will be happy to assist you.  Please note that our property is historic and therefore, has no accessible features on the property or in the guest rooms.

1728 West 1st Ave
Spokane, WA 99201
(509) 301-1377
Owners:  Louie Cranehahn, Gillian Cranehahn

gillianuseag@gmail.com

We work very hard to provide an easy-to-use online experience for all guests. We believe all of our website visitors should be able to easily research online on http://www.1899house.com regardless of device type and whether an individual requires assistive technology.  If you have any questions or would like to report any issues related to the accessibility features of our property’s website, please contact us at gillianuseag@gmail.com

Drone Shot View The 1899 House B&B Policies

History of the 1899 House

Celebrating 120 WONDERFUL YEARS
In 2019, 1899 House Bed & Breakfast celebrates its 120th year. It is on the national and local historic registries as the Edward Louis and Dora Powell House (that’s not a previously called thing). Our registered business name is the 1899 House Bed & Breakfast.

The house was built in a “restrained Queen Anne” style, for Spokane’s tenth mayor and his wife Dora, after he was no longer in office (he was a single-term mayor, as most are, from 1893-4). Its designer was then-well-known master architect, Loren Rand, who had designed many preeminent buildings throughout Spokane after the great fire of 1889, such as Lewis & Clark High School and the Masonic Temple. Their five children were born and raised in the home, and it remained in the family until the 1950’s.

The Edward Louis and Dora Powell House
This lovely restrained Queen Anne Victorian home celebrates its 120th year in 2019, with a complete restoration of its original exterior colors!

1930’s

View in 1901, with city-placed forms for the new sidewalks! This is the main entry face, or south view.

1950’s to 1970’s

 Redo, and first sale out of family, then converted to six apartments.

2013 South Face ready to prime

The house was stripped to its original siding. Historic colors were assessed and approved by the historic registry, and restoration began with the west (and most-weathered) face, to the left in this photograph. The entire house was primered though, prior to beginning formal paint colors.
2013 finally in primer for the first time, but all had to be redone when the contractor did not return in spring, as he’d promised; later, the stairs, posts and rails were restored before final painting by another local contractor–builders from A Painter’s Touch.
West face 2010

Scraping, caulking and re-primering of the most-weathered west face began in 2012.  It was an extremely tedious, but needful lot of work.  As anyone who has worked on one of these Grand Dames will know, there is a great deal of prep work to be done carefully, prior to actually painting… This took YEARS in our case, as we worked with contractors that sometimes walked away, and against weather that always seemed to get pretty cold once we began….or extremely hot…depending.  The west face was also home to an added entry stairway that was never part of the original home; we believe the new owners added it for access to the second-floor apartments in the 1950’s.  It was extremely industrial inside, and outside it was very poorly constructed.  It dropped users off in the driveway, and the last step was a doozy.  By 2010, there were, in fact, NO steps!  More on the redesign and construction of the guest entry, below.

primer year two
By the time the snow flew in 2012, we at least had it all re-primered, protected until the following summer (2013), when application of approved, original Victorian colors began.
And in the end, the effort was all worth it! Here you also see the west guest entry porch totally redesigned and reconstructed as well, with permission from the Historic Review folks, and funding from a grant from the Spokane Preservation Advocates, that also funded the restoration of the signature arch on the south face, by Architect Loren Rand.

In 2010, what would become the West Guest Entry looked like this!  We commissioned the then-local architect, Esteban Vallejo, who designed a new porch consistent with the front and sides of the home.  Carpenters from “A Painter’s Touch” built and painted the larger features, and its finer embellishments, as well as those on the front porch, and north face, were completed by Master Ceramicist, Rebecca Trainor.

The new stairs turned 90 degrees, allowing a much smoother exit to the sidewalk and corner street parking.

Restoration seems never to end, however, and this year, in honor of her 120th birthday, we are finally completing at least the face of the final north side.  While finances do not permit restoration of the north balcony at this time, We still plan to restore the back porch railing and security doors beneath the porch, that will eventually house our home generator system.  The back porch concrete stairs will be removed, and sturdy wooden ones with rails compatible with the west guest porch, will be installed, also facing west. The brick from the 1930’s garage will be used to pave the driveway, and a new garage, redesigned to be more consistent with the rest of the house, will be constructed, once permission is obtained.  THEN the exterior restoration of this glorious Victorian Dame will be complete!

For her 120th birthday we have at last finished painting the final, north face of…

The Edward Louis and Dora Powell House
This lovely restrained Queen Anne Victorian home celebrates its 120th year in 2019, with a complete restoration of its original exterior colors!
Old House The 1899 House B&B Policies

1930’s

View in 1901, with city-placed forms for the new sidewalks! This is the main entry face, or south view.

1950’s to 1970’s

 Redo, and first sale out of family, then converted to six apartments.

2013 South Face ready to prime

The house was stripped to its original siding. Historic colors were assessed and approved by the historic registry, and restoration began with the west (and most-weathered) face, to the left in this photograph. The entire house was primered though, prior to beginning formal paint colors.
2013 finally in primer for the first time, but all had to be redone when the contractor did not return in spring, as he’d promised; later, the stairs, posts and rails were restored before final painting by another local contractor–builders from A Painter’s Touch.
West face 2010

Scraping, caulking and re-primering of the most-weathered west face began in 2012.  It was an extremely tedious, but needful lot of work.  As anyone who has worked on one of these Grand Dames will know, there is a great deal of prep work to be done carefully, prior to actually painting… This took YEARS in our case, as we worked with contractors that sometimes walked away, and against weather that always seemed to get pretty cold once we began….or extremely hot…depending.  The west face was also home to an added entry stairway that was never part of the original home; we believe the new owners added it for access to the second-floor apartments in the 1950’s.  It was extremely industrial inside, and outside it was very poorly constructed.  It dropped users off in the driveway, and the last step was a doozy.  By 2010, there were, in fact, NO steps!  More on the redesign and construction of the guest entry, below.

primer year two
By the time the snow flew in 2012, we at least had it all re-primered, protected until the following summer (2013), when application of approved, original Victorian colors began.
And in the end, the effort was all worth it! Here you also see the west guest entry porch totally redesigned and reconstructed as well, with permission from the Historic Review folks, and funding from a grant from the Spokane Preservation Advocates, that also funded the restoration of the signature arch on the south face, by Architect Loren Rand.

In 2010, what would become the West Guest Entry looked like this!  We commissioned the then-local architect, Esteban Vallejo, who designed a new porch consistent with the front and sides of the home.  Carpenters from “A Painter’s Touch” built and painted the larger features, and its finer embellishments, as well as those on the front porch, and north face, were completed by Master Ceramicist, Rebecca Trainor.

The new stairs turned 90 degrees, allowing a much smoother exit to the sidewalk and corner street parking.

Restoration seems never to end, however, and this year, in honor of her 120th birthday, we are finally completing at least the face of the final north side.  While finances do not permit restoration of the north balcony at this time, We still plan to restore the back porch railing and security doors beneath the porch, that will eventually house our home generator system.  The back porch concrete stairs will be removed, and sturdy wooden ones with rails compatible with the west guest porch, will be installed, also facing west. The brick from the 1930’s garage will be used to pave the driveway, and a new garage, redesigned to be more consistent with the rest of the house, will be constructed, once permission is obtained.  THEN the exterior restoration of this glorious Victorian Dame will be complete!

For her 120th birthday we have at last finished painting the final, north face of…

EAST FACE Repair and Restoration

The East Face of the house was severely damaged from the 1990’s, when former owners installed a hot tub and deck was placed at the end of the yard abutting the side of the house.  Rain water from interlacing roof sections overhead ruined the siding, underlayment, insulation, and almost the floor joists.  In 2016 we began the removal of the old deck and stair seating, as well as the hot tub, and repairs to the siding on the entire NE end and N side was begun by Engineer/Contractor Peter Cooper.

Painting began in fall, by young Alex Pratt, probably the most conscientious and consistently good painter we’ve had.  He completed work using ladders and scaffolding in about six weeks.

NORTH AND FINAL FACE:  At this writing, we have completed painting the north face, as mentioned, and once gutters, downspouts and French drains are completed, we can redo the pavers on the east patio, and add the planned gazebo seating area where the old deck used to be.  Seating options will then include a much wider variety than ever, and group gatherings may resume!  We have also inherited a “green egg” Japanese bbq from Gillian’s family’s tour living in Japan in the 1960’s, and Louie is now making a table for it to sit in.  BBQ’s have already resumed!

A rare winter view in the 1930’s shows the now-removed north balcony/sleeping porch, and that there was originally NO west entry at all. The small and larger (with smokestack) structures behind the still-existing garages/carriage house are long gone. As shown, there was once a balcony/sleeping porch on the north face, second floor, but we assume it was removed in the conversion to apartments, between the 1950’s and 1970’s. One day, we may be able to restore that too, but for now, the small window has been removed and the area re-sided.

TaDAAA!

This fall, work finally commenced on formal flower beds on the south and south-west faces of the house.  No one had really worked on those since the home’s purchase, and there was much to be done; since taking this photo, all iris have been removed, to be redistributed, and a weed-retardant cloth will be laid down soon.  It has taken nearly a decade of hard work, and half a dozen different contractors to complete this Grand Dame’s exterior restoration, in its original Victorian colors, during construction- and painting-compatible northwest weather.  As of this writing, we have yet to complete work on the garages, the back porch railing and stairs, as well as the storage area underneath, that contractor Cooper paved for us when he removed the porch’s surface and original railings and gate.  Eventually, the stairs will be redone, facing west along the side of the house, and under the porch will be secure doors so that storage may be safely used, including housing a generator that will be wired into the electric room adjoining the porch’s west wall, in the basement.  As you can see, even after a decade of applied attention, there are still projects!  And that’s just the Exterior!

Inside

The work recommenced with a vengeance in 2011-12, with the restoration of second floor flooring and three of four individual rooms/suites.  During conversion to apartments, someone had laid down black tar and black-rubber-backed indoor-outdoor carpeting in the hallway and on the main stairway, that had to be scraped off, and heavily sanded before any fine work could be done.  In each room, which had held little metal kitchens on the oak floors, with no protection at all, so much mold and discoloration had to be carefully removed, sanded and varnished.

There was, needless to say, a LOT of sanding, varnishing, and repeating, repeating!

The front stairs to the second level still have some of the black stain from their earlier covering, but are much-improved, wide and still in excellent condition.

The main hallway went from tar to beautiful again…

and hard work paid off!

The west guest entry interior stairs went from beat-up industrial to more formal…and we replaced all guest door locks with combination locks, so no one has to carry keys or cards to enter or exit—or potentially lose.

EAST FACE Repair and Restoration

The East Face of the house was severely damaged from the 1990’s, when former owners installed a hot tub and deck was placed at the end of the yard abutting the side of the house at the end of the yard.  Rain water from interlacing roof sections overhead ruined the siding, underlayment, insulation, and almost the floor joists.  In 2016 we began the removal of the old deck and stair seating, as well as the hot tub, and repairs to the siding on the entire NE end and N side was begun by Engineer/Contractor Peter Cooper.

Painting began in fall, by young Alex Pratt, probably the most conscientious and consistently good painter we’ve had.  He completed work using ladders and scaffolding in about six weeks.

NORTH AND FINAL FACE:  At this writing, we have completed painting the north face, as mentioned, and once gutters, downspouts and French drains are completed, we can redo the pavers on the east patio, and add the planned gazebo seating area where the old deck used to be.  Seating options will then include a much wider variety than ever, and group gatherings may resume!  We have also inherited a “green egg” Japanese bbq from Gillian’s family’s tour living in Japan in the 1960’s, and Louie is now making a table for it to sit in.  BBQ’s have already resumed!

A rare winter view in the 1930’s shows the now-removed north balcony/sleeping porch, and that there was originally NO west entry at all. The small and larger (with smokestack) structures behind the still-existing garages/carriage house are long gone. As shown, there was once a balcony/sleeping porch on the north face, second floor, but we assume it was removed in the conversion to apartments, between the 1950’s and 1970’s. One day, we may be able to restore that too, but for now, the small window has been removed and the area re-sided.

TaDAAA!

This fall, work finally commenced on formal flower beds on the south and south-west faces of the house.  No one had really worked on those since the home’s purchase, and there was much to be done; since taking this photo, all iris have been removed, to be redistributed, and a weed-retardant cloth will be laid down soon.  It has taken nearly a decade of hard work, and half a dozen different contractors to complete this Grand Dame’s exterior restoration, in its original Victorian colors, during construction- and painting-compatible northwest weather.  As of this writing, we have yet to complete work on the garages, the back porch railing and stairs, as well as the storage area underneath, that contractor Cooper paved for us when he removed the porch’s surface and original railings and gate.  Eventually, the stairs will be redone, facing west along the side of the house, and under the porch will be secure doors so that storage may be safely used, including housing a generator that will be wired into the electric room adjoining the porch’s west wall, in the basement.  As you can see, even after a decade of applied attention, there are still projects!  And that’s just the Exterior!  

Inside

The work recommenced with a vengeance in 2011-12, with the restoration of second floor flooring and three of four individual rooms/suites.  During conversion to apartments, someone had laid down black tar and black-rubber-backed indoor-outdoor carpeting in the hallway and on the main stairway, that had to be scraped off, and heavily sanded before any fine work could be done.  In each room, which had held little metal kitchens on the oak floors, with no protection at all, so much mold and discoloration had to be carefully removed, sanded and varnished.

There was, needless to say, a LOT of sanding, varnishing, and repeating, repeating!

The front stairs to the second level still have some of the black stain from their earlier covering, but are much-improved, wide and still in excellent condition.

The main hallway went from tar to beautiful again…

and hard work paid off!

The west guest entry interior stairs went from beat-up industrial to more formal…and we replaced all guest door locks with combination locks, so no one has to carry keys or cards to enter or exit—or potentially lose.

The Dora Suite Renovation

The Dora Suite is named for the wife of the house’s founder.  Work on the Dora Suite commenced in 2010, but took nearly a year, as we also were working outside, and on the Rigsby Suite across the hall, and had not learned to pace ourselves physically or financially at that point–steep learning curves, especially with Louie working full time!  The Dora had been a single apartment with a kitchenette and bath, so the floors were very needy.  It’s done in lovely shades of pale lavender and gray, with a dragon-themed oriental rug, and unlike the rest of the rooms, its woodwork is painted white.

While we’d initially planned to put a Murphy bed in there, and potentially be able to rent it for meetings as well as overnights, after living in it ourselves for a bit, (as we have all of the suites), it really did not lend itself to that, so we decorated it as a queen suite.  It’s on the quieter northeast corner of the house, cooler in summer, and warmer in winter.  It has a lovely Jacuzzi tub with hand shower, and wing-backed chairs, and holds a small fiction library as well as a dvd-tv with hundreds of classic movies available.  At some point, downloadable television will be installed, but in the meantime, housewide wi-fi allows guests to download tv if they wish, on their own laptops or phones.  It is our most popular room for shorter stays, mother-daughter escapes and romantic getaways, but the number of men wishing to stay there has surprised us.  We had no idea how many guys had restless leg syndrome, and love a tub before sleeping.

The Rigsby Suite

The Rigsby Suite is named for Jack Rigsby, who married into the Powell family through Edward and Dora’s only daughter, Gerda.  Both Gerda and her mother lived out their days in the family home, and Gerda has occasionally been heard looking for Dora in this suite.  Rigsby was in substantially better condition than Dora had been, but is larger, so took nearly as long to refinish as Dora did.  It is done in shades of cool sage green with black and gold highlights.  A rendition we like to think of as young Jack, stealing a smoke, adorns one wall, while an original oil of 1900’s Coeur d’Alene Park, by local artist Patty Simpson Ward is at the entry.  The rest of the walls have exotic bird prints, from Native American to Audubon to oriental.  It is on the south side of the house, so gets the morning sun, and fall breezes; for guest-convenience, there are black-out drapes in the Rigsby.  It has a large stand-up shower, heated towel racks, a wet bar and wine cooler, and networking tv, and is more appropriate for longer stays.  It also can sleep a “third man” on a hideaway twin bed in its love seat.  Here too, housewide wi-fi allows guests to download whatever they wish, on their own laptops, tablets, or phones.

Here again, all of our hard work has paid off in the spacious Rigsby!

The Rigsby Suite

The Rigsby Suite is named for Jack Rigsby, who married into the Powell family through Edward and Dora’s only daughter, Gerda.  Both Gerda and her mother lived out their days in the family home, and Gerda has occasionally been heard looking for Dora in this suite.  Rigsby was in substantially better condition than Dora had been, but is larger, so took nearly as long to refinish as Dora did.  It is done in shades of cool sage green with black and gold highlights.  A rendition we like to think of as young Jack, stealing a smoke, adorns one wall, while an original oil of 1900’s Coeur d’Alene Park, by local artist Patty Simpson Ward is at the entry.  The rest of the walls have exotic bird prints, from Native American to Audubon to oriental.  It is on the south side of the house, so gets the morning sun, and fall breezes; for guest-convenience, there are black-out drapes in the Rigsby.  It has a large stand-up shower, heated towel racks, a wet bar and wine cooler, and networking tv, and is more appropriate for longer stays.  It also can sleep a “third man” on a hideaway twin bed in its love seat.  Here too, housewide wi-fi allows guests to download whatever they wish, on their own laptops, tablets, or phones.

Here again, all of our hard work has paid off in the spacious Rigsby!

Hospitality Suite

The Work continues on the first floor’s west parlor suite—its bathroom was finished in winter of 2018-19.  The original wood floors that need resurfacing and good varnish as we’ve done for the second floor.  The kitchen and its bath/laundry room are still on the list, along with redoing the basement stairs and pantry.  

In the West Parlor bathroom, it was decided to install tile floors similar to those in the Dora Suite, period-appropriate, but build a lipless shower.  At some point in the future, this will be the suite most closely accommodating an elder guest or person using a walker.  This winter, we hope to complete the bathroom’s woodwork, and renovate the sleeping section of this suite.  It’s to be done in deep teal and navy shades, similar to those in the wallpaper in the adjoining living room, probably with white or traditional oak furnishings.  Its original 1899 flooring is in wonderful condition.

The lipless shower is a first for the house, with many tiled storage niches.

On the second floor the final and largest, king suite—Called the Edward– will be completed in the next year or so, along with its bathroom, and there will be one more room available!  It, like the Rigsby Suite, will probably hold a day bed in addition to our only king, and, possibly a twin trundle—so a maximum occupancy of four.

Discover many ways
to enjoy your stay in Spokane!

Things to Do in and Around Spokane

Spokane is a year-‘round city, bustling with sports, dining, concerts, theatre, shopping, and so much more. There are 76 lakes and dozens of rivers within an hour’s drive, sponsoring a wide variety of boating, cruising, tubing, floating, paddle-board activities, and swimming. There are seven ski resorts within two hours’ drive from downtown, and they are usually open from Thanksgiving to Easter. Seven fantastic public golf courses call Spokane home and PARKS! Spokane is home to wonderful parks, from the South Hill’s multicultural Manito Park and Japanese Gardens, to Downtown’s Spokane River history-emphasizing Huntington Park, and the newly-restored Riverfront Park with its native sculptures, Big Red Wagon, Water Park, Carousel, Ice Ribbon recreation, and Pavilion Event Center—Spokane truly is, “near nature, near perfect”!

On average, Spokane gets 171 sunny days every year, and some kind of precipitation 115 days a year—this includes rain, snow, sleet or hail and SNIRT (Spokane winters are famous for snirt, a combination of dirt and snow!). On days when it might be too hot, too cold, or too wet, there’s still much to do. There are more than a dozen live-stage theatres, and more if one includes rock concert venues and more than ten movie-plexes. If you’re hungry, check out some of the 1200 restaurants, and seek Yelp or many other on-line reviewers. Spokane has some very fine chefs, as well as fast food, and a wild variety in-between. It is a multicultural city, partly because of its colleges, and partly because of the longstanding relationship it has with Fairchild Airforce Base nearby. If one eats something that looks like Mexican food, it may actually be Puerto Rican, Cuban, Colombian, Nicaraguan, Brazilian, Argentinian or Spanish regional, depending. If one craves Asian cuisine, it might be Filipino, Chinese, Thai, Japanese or a combination! Your hosts are not originally from Spokane, and yet they have found this truly to be, a “big little city” with almost everything major metro areas like LA, San Francisco, Seattle, Washington, DC or Miami have—only without the traffic and long waits. And if you don’t want to use your car, Uber and Lyft both operate; Lime provides both scooters and bikes in summer; bus service is only a block from the B&B, and it’s a lovely neighborhood to walk or jog in.

 Watch the 10 Best Places To Live In Washington State (USA) 2019.

Big City The 1899 House B&B
Sometimes guests like it here so much that they want to come back. A few have come back to purchase homes and live here full time. Property values county-wide are lower than most big cities, so you can get a lot of home for your money. Spokane has 82 public K-12 schools in several districts, most rated 8-9 on the Great Schools.org scale. There are also several community colleges and three four-year colleges (all with masters programs as well) in Spokane; Gonzaga, Whitworth and Eastern Washington University, plus a multi-college campus near Gonzaga, housing programs from Washington State University and University of Washington nursing and medical departments. Fairchild also hosts Embry-riddle Aeronautical U, Park U and Webster external campuses; and Moody Bible Institute and the Spokane Tribal College have campuses. Spokane is also home to the Glen Dow Academy of Hair Design. So, if it’s education you’re after, whether as a resident or sabbatical learner, Spokane has a lot to offer you and your family.

Most of our guests, however, will be interested in less than a week’s stay. For you, our best advice is to log on to Visit Spokane.org for the latest calendar and listings of events. Fox Theatre and the INB Performing Arts calendars will also list Broadway musicals, concerts, the symphony, and much more…and there are several casinos within a 40-minute drive of the city that host rock concerts and shows as well. New activities are always being added!

Take a look at our Big Little City, Spokane, “Near Nature, Near Perfect!” and let us know how the 1899 House B&B can assist your weekend or week-long get-away!

Blooms Day The 1899 House B&B
Spokane hosts a 10K each spring, Bloomsday… and a 3-on-3 “HoopFest” event each summer. Each of these usually has over 40,000 participants from all over the Pacific Northwest and Canada, as well as several foreign countries. If you intend to visit Spokane during early May or late June, make reservations in advance! This is also true of coming here during college or high school graduation times from mid-May through mid-June each year.
Duncan Garden The 1899 House B&B

There are literally dozens of well-maintained parks, reserved wild spaces and national forests in and within an hour’s drive of Spokane. Above is a view of Duncan Gardens, part of Manito Park on the South Hill of Spokane. Manito also contains a conservatory of tropical and desert plants, a lovely Japanese garden with koi ponds and meditation areas and statuary, and a rose garden.
The interactive Spokane County Parks, Open Space & Trails map that follows is available on line and regularly updated. If you are a hiker, camper, fisherperson, rafter, kayaker, canoeist, glamper, or just want a great walk in the fresh air, this map is for you! It can be downloaded at your convenience from the Spokane Parks and Recreation website.

MapThe 1899 House B&B
 Huntington Park 1899 House B&B
This is a view from south to north, from the upper level of Huntington Park, downtown beside City Hall, looking north across the river to a relatively new development called Kendall Yards. Check out that area’s street musicians, night market, wine-tasting rooms, galleries and restaurants—Umi Sushi there is one of our favorites. Expect some parking challenges, and make reservations—it’s popular!
This is the view looking up from the first set of stairs at the entry of Huntington Park. Huntington opened three years ago or so, and one may walk on stairs and paved walks, or take trails along the Spokane River’s south side, studying many plaques that contain information about the history of water power in the city, and the many ways it has been harnessed to support a variety of industries in and around Spokane.
If walking Huntington is not your cup of tea, you can grab a cable car at Riverfront Park, and view its power!
Closer to the B&B, a two-block, historic walk will take you to Cannon Circle’s many restaurants, among them Browne’s Bistro and the Itlalia Trattoria. Our neighborhood pub, The Elk, is also there. Good eating without the city’s parking or crowds that attend our many events, if you arrive on one of those weekends. During the summer, free concerts happen every Thursday night, in nearby Coeur d’Alene Park (named for the tribe, not the nearby Idaho city!)
Columbia River 1899 House B&B
Spokane’s major attraction, for many, both visitors and locals, is its river, that winds and babbles, and sometimes furiously rips through its entirety, running roughly east to west, from Lake Coeur d’Alene in Idaho, through seven dams, to join the Columbia River, near Davenport, Washington. It provides endless moments of amazement, thrills, water sports, support for fish and wildlife, and pure joy.
River Park 1899 House B&B
Riverfront Park holds a calmed portion of the river, as well as a tented market with light show (opened September 2019), some carnival rides, the Ice/roller Ribbon, concessions, a water park, the Louff Carousel (completely restored, rehoused, and reopened in 2019), and many lovely trails. In summer, outdoor movies are often shown, and for two years in a row, it was the only northwest venue to host the Chinese Lantern Festival. Each year in late August, it hosts a week of Pig Out in the Park bands and food trucks. In spring, it is one of the features included in Spokane’s Bloomsday 10K. Year ‘round it is enjoyed by hundreds.
Louff Carousel 1899 House B&B
Louff Carousel, night view
Local Tribe PowWow 1899 House B&B
Local tribal PowWow each August, in Riverfront Park
West View River 1899 House B&B
This is a west-to-east view of the river, and the Monroe Bridge, quite near the B&B and downtown.
West View River Night Shot 1899 House B&B Policies
and..a night shot…
There are many riverside or overlooking restaurants where one can enjoy a fine glass of “something” from cocktails to award-winning Northwest wines, to locally-roasted coffees, along with gourmet food.
Winter, Spring, Summer or fall, the views in and around Spokane are spectacular!
Both of your hosts have lived and worked in the New England states, and love the colors of the fall leaves there. Washington State and Spokane may not be Connecticut or DC, but our trees put on a grand show, and Autumn is coming! So is Winter! This is especially lovely in our historic neighborhoods and parks.
A river really does run all the way through it….in fact, several rivers and larger and smaller creeks!
Ice Skating Ribbon 1899 House B&B
In 2017, Spokane’s first ice-skating ribbon opened just after Thanksgiving been a tremendous hit, both with locals and out-of-town guests. One can rent all skates and safety gear, and in summer, when ice can no longer be effectively maintained, it converts to a roller ribbon!
Christmas is spectacular in the atrium of the Historic Davenport Hotel (sister to the newer Davenport Grand), that hosts the Festival of Trees benefit for the Spokane Symphony each year, between Thanksgiving and mid-December, followed by a gingerbread structure competition.
Another popular time to visit is February, when the bald eagles return to lakes all over the area.

But Wait! There’s more!

From November through April, SKI….and then in spring….GOLF!

Ski The Northwest Rockies

SKI THE NORTHWEST ROCKIES
Spokane and Coeur d’Alene are surrounded by four unique alpine resorts inside of 200 square miles, averaging over 300 inches of snowfall a season. Each unique hill offers a rich variety of skiing and riding, spectacular scenery and good old-fashioned, down-to-earth hospitality. Ski The Northwest Rockies is a non-profit association representing the Inland Northwest snowsports industry, this includes four ski areas along with snowsport industry retailers. Our mission is to raise awareness of Inland Northwest Skiing and Snowboarding opportunities.

Spokane County Golf Courses

SPOKANE COUNTY GOLF COURSES
Spokane County owns and operates three beautiful 18-hole championship public municipal golf courses serving residents as well as visitors to the area. They are some of the best public golf courses in the area with green fees under $40. All are within only 20 minutes of Downtown Spokane and a typical round only takes an average of 4 hours and 20 minutes to complete “While We’re Young”. We emphasize Pace of Play here at Spokane County Golf Courses.

Lakes

LAKES in 1899 House B&B
Spokane’s 76 regional lakes boost some the nation’s best boating, camping, fishing and resorts. Visitors can spread out lakeside in the lavish Coeur d’Alene Resort or hike to Upper Priest Lake nestled in the Selkirk Mountains. Book a house boat for a weekend on Lake Roosevelt or set up a tent under the stars at Lake Pend Oreille.

Learn more about
our owners and the innkeeper

Meet our Innkeeper Partners

Louie Flores III is a first-generation Cuban-American raised in Florida. He has lived and worked in several major cities of the United States, and his work often demanded much travel. He settled in Spokane in 2002 and purchased the Edward Louis and Dora Powel House, with the hope of restoring it to a single family home. When purchased, it was still cut into five of the six apartments that had been carved into it when the Powell-Rigsby family relinquished it for the first time in 1953. Like many older Victorians in the historic district, it had experienced much hard wear, and needed much internal and external renovation and repair. While working full time as a mortgage broker, he began the restoration journey, from peaked roof to basement, with the help of contractors and the Spokane Preservation Advocates, and had the home placed on the National and Spokane Registers of Historic Places, to protect it. In late 2012, the 1899 House Bed and Breakfast opened its first suite for business, followed by the second in early 2013! A Hospitality Suite was added by the end of the year…and work recommenced on the exterior.

When not working on the B&B, or brokering mortgages, Louie has worked in the local film industry on commercials and in several other productions, and was one of the founders of the Hispanic Food Network TV series.

Meet our Innkeeper Partners

Louie Flores III is a first-generation Cuban-American raised in Florida. He has lived and worked in several major cities of the United States, and his work often demanded much travel. He settled in Spokane in 2002 and purchased the Edward Louis and Dora Powel House, with the hope of restoring it to a single family home. When purchased, it was still cut into five of the six apartments that had been carved into it when the Powell-Rigsby family relinquished it for the first time in 1953. Like many older Victorians in the historic district, it had experienced much hard wear, and needed much internal and external renovation and repair. While working full time as a mortgage broker, he began the restoration journey, from peaked roof to basement, with the help of contractors and the Spokane Preservation Advocates, and had the home placed on the National and Spokane Registers of Historic Places, to protect it. In late 2012, the 1899 House Bed and Breakfast opened its first suite for business, followed by the second in early 2013! A Hospitality Suite was added by the end of the year…and work recommenced on the exterior.

When not working on the B&B, or brokering mortgages, Louie has worked in the local film industry on commercials and in several other productions, and was one of the founders of the Hispanic Food Network TV series.

A first-generation Cuban-American raised in Florida, Louie Flores, III lived all over the United States before settling in Spokane. In 2002, he purchased the Edward Louis Powell House and began restoring it as a single-family home, before opening as the 1899 House Bed & Breakfast, in late 2012. It is on the national registry of historic homes, as well as the Spokane registry.

In addition to being the owner of the house, he is employed full time in the mortgage industry and is a part-time actor with many screen credits, mostly local productions, and he was one of the three original founders of the Hispanic Food Network TV series.

The daughter of a DoD career engineer, and formerly affiliated with the U.S. Navy as an intercultural relations trainer, Gillian has travelled extensively across the U.S. and lived and worked in both Italy and Japan for several years. She loved staying in pensiones, hotels, youth hostels and inns everywhere, and envisioned retiring one day from crisis and family counseling, and teaching psychology, to work part-time for a bed and breakfast. It was not in the plan to OWN and Operate one! But she met Louie in 2010, decided to retire from classroom and clinic, and the rest is history. Their ideas and vision for a restored restrained Queen Anne Victorian home, adapted to accommodate not only themselves but family, friends and paying guests, has turned into a lovely reality for them both. It’s been a decade, and they’re still on the project, and on the job!
Gillian is the daughter of a DOD travelling family, raised in Washington, as well as in Japan. She later worked with the U.S. Navy as a civilian, and continued travelling, mostly throughout the US and Europe. She holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology and secondary education, a master’s in public policy and ethics, and an augmented master’s in psychology and education. She retired in 2009 from these second and third careers: nearly four decades of teaching undergraduates in four-year and community college systems, and doing emergency intake, crisis and family counseling for community mental health agencies and shelters in South Carolina and Washington State.

Like Louie, throughout her life, she had many enjoyable travel experiences with youth hostels, pensiones and bed and breakfasts, in and outside the US. It was a long-held dream to be staff for a bed and breakfast one day, and partnering with Louie, she has found an exceedingly special home and dream work! She hopes to bring many of her own happy B&B experiences to guests at the 1899 House, as its Innkeeper